04/05/2008 13:06

August 1897

 

August

 

RARELY have the crops looked more promising than this year. The prospects of an abundant harvest were most cheering, and rarely has an abundant harvest appeared more necessary. The wheat crops in all countries from which England has been in the habit of drawing supplies have been a comparative failure except in America. The consequence was inevitable, Americans determined to get the highest possible price for their wheat. Their intention was to raise it five shillings a coomb.

Had our harvest been a scanty one, the price to us might have been even more. As it is, bread must necessarily be dearer this winter, but at all events the English agriculturist will have his share of the benefit of higher prices. It must always be remembered that of every £5 paid for flour in England, £4 leaves this country. We are all very anxious now for a week's fine weather, to enable the outstanding corn to be gathered in.

THAT the harvest should be a time of great anxiety is quite intelligible, but it is not intelligible that just that time when men are gathering in the gifts of God, and are partakers of the benefits of the great miracle of His creative power, should be the time when God's House is attended least.

Surely a Sunday of prayer and thanksgiving would not make peopIe tired, but would make them much happier, and also worthier of the blessings of the harvest about which they are so anxious. When religion becomes a part of our lives, neither harvest nor anything else will keep us away from God, but rather draw us nearer to Him by reminding us of His loving care.

WE shall celebrate the Harvest. Festival on Wednesday, Sept 22nd. Oh, would that it could be really a representative gathering of all who love the Lord, and look to Him as the Giver of all good gifts. Offerings will be received at the church on Tuesday 21st, and will be sent as in previous years for the use of the patients in Addenbrooke's Hospital. We hope therefore the gifts of fruit and vegetables and other things may be abundant. Gifts of flowers, wheat, oats and barley will be welcomed. Also any help on Tuesday, the day before the Festival to decorate the the church. All the collections will be sent to Addenbrooke's Hospital, £2 2s., being deducted as J. subscription to the Convalescent Home at Hunstanton.

THE Harvest Festival at Pymoor will be held this year on Sunday, October 3rd. We should have preferred a week-day, but owing to the absence of Mr. Colebrook on his holiday we shall this year have to adhere to the old custom.

AT S. Owen's we shall hold our Thanksgiving Service. on Tuesday, October 5th. A special service will be held at 7 p.m., at which we want to see all who feel any gratitude to God for His goodness in the harvest.

THE Schools will re-open on Monday, September 20th. The children will have had a good long holiday by then, and it is earnestly hoped that every child will be there. All parents should remember that to keep a child from school means depriving it of knowledge, depriving the school of grant, and by reducing the grant to the school, also reducing the amount the Feoffees are able to give to the poor at Christmas.

WE are hoping now to see some movement on the part of the postal authorities towards establishing a Telegraph Office. The required guarantee was given by the Parish Council the middle of last month.

THE beginning of August a large gathering of those interested in Foreign Missions was held at Ely. Eleven bishops from different parts of the world were present to relate their experiences. Apart from the influence exercised in stirring up missionary zeal by such gatherings, it does us all so much good to hear how the Church of Christ is slowly but surely possessing the hearts of people in every quarter of the globe. 80 much may be done towards religious unity by showing sympathy with those missionary efforts, and whilst working hard to make our own country more Christian, at the same time we must not forget that we must help to convert the millions of those abroad who are still heathen.

MR. COOKE, in his last letter from India, tells us how he has been in the midst of earthquakes and riots. He says that whilst sitting outside a friend's house, suddenly without any warning, all the plaster and part of the wall was shaken down. However, he escaped without harm. Worse than this danger is the unsettled state of the minds of the Mohammedans, whose religion incites them to terrible acts of bloodshed. Periodically there is a great outbreak of religious fanaticism. There have been several of these lately. Still, in spite of considerable danger, the members of the Mission to which Mr. Cooke is attached have fortunately all escaped with their lives. How all those faithful men must have felt the force of S. Paul's words, "If He laid down His life for us, shall not we lay down our lives for the brethren."

ON Wednesday, September 22nd, the day of the Harvest Festival, we propose having a Garden Party in the Rectory Garden. We want it to be part of the Harvest Festival. The things which remain from our last sale will be offered for sale. A band will play during the afternoon. Tea will be provided in the garden. Threepence will be charged for admission, and whatever is over after the expenses have been paid will be added to the sum in the bank for building a Parish Room. We want a fine day and we want everyone to come. All will be heartily welcomed, as well as any contributions anyone may be disposed to send.

THE Working Party at the Rectory at 6-60, will be commenced again on Friday, 17th. This most useful and at the same time most sociable institution should be well patronized. All the work done is in behalf of the fund for the Parish Room.

WE are unable to give the balance sheet of the Flower Show as promised in last magazine, because we have not ourselves received it yet, but if report be correct, the balance in hand has risen not from £8 15s., to £15, but from £8 15s., to £20. If this be really true, we imagine a considerable development of the Flower Show may be anticipated in coming years

 

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Parish magazine 1897

04/05/2008 12:54

January 1897

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February 1897

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May 1897

  May OUR first words must be those of...

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04/05/2008 13:03

June 1897

  June THE sixtieth year of Her Majesty the...

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04/05/2008 13:05

July 1897

  July THE past month has been one of varied...

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04/05/2008 13:06

August 1897

  August   RARELY have the crops looked...

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04/05/2008 13:07

September 1897

  September THE past has been a month almost...

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04/05/2008 13:08

October 1897

  October Two more Harvest Festivals have...

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Littledownham


Parish Magazine 1898

04/05/2008 13:16

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