04/05/2008 13:05

July 1897

 

July

THE past month has been one of varied entertainments, and opportunities for enjoyment. Now we are on the eve of the harvest. Everyone is preparing for this great work of the year, the ingathering of the harvest. It stands all around us in the glory of its abundance, the beautiful gift of God assuring man of his care. and providence. The fields of this parish have probably never looked fuller of promise than this Year. Would that all engaged in the harvest might approach it in that spirit of gratitude, devotion and reverence which should mark the acknowledgement of the great Giver in His gift to us all.

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ON Saturday, July 10th, the Rector took his Bible class to London for the day. The whole day was spent in sight-seeing from one end of London to the other. The Bank of England, Mansion House, St. Paul's Cathedral, Charing Cross, Trafalgar Square, Horseguards, St. James' Park, House of Lords, House of Commons, Westminster Abbey and the Tower of London were all visited. Some of them which were full of historical associations were thoroughly inspected. Besides this, by means of a steamer on the Thames, the various bridges, including the new Tower bridge, were visited; and finally a ride on the top of an omnibus took them back to Liverpool Street Station, whence they reached home again after a very happy and instructive day

THE Flower Show this year partook more of the character of a village holiday. Fortunately a fine day came to the assistance of all the arrangements made by the Committee for the amusement of the people. It was readily conceded that everything connected with the show was an improvement upon former years. The Show itself was exceptionally good both in vegetables, fruit and flowers; considering the cold spring and the very dry summer we did not look forward to such good vegetables or fruit. However there was no falling off. In the case of the red currants one of the judges was heard to say, that every dish shown deserved a prize. The Cottager's class was thinner than usual owing to the exclusion of tradesmen who in former years exhibited largely in this class. On the other hand there were more flowers shown than ever before, and they added greatly to the attraction of the Show. The Sports were very much more keenly contested than in former years owing probably to the fact that the prizes were slightly better, and the bicycle races ware so arranged that the hundreds of sightseers could watch them from beginning to end. The cricket match ended in a victory for Downham over Littleport by eight wickets, and took place on a splendid wicket with which no one could possibly find fault. The result of the show has been that a day of real enjoyment was provided, and that last year's balance in hand of £8 15s has jumped up to about £15. The details of the account will be given in the next magazine. This balance will no doubt enable the committee to extend the usefulness and attractions of the Show. it would be ungrateful to close these remarks without a few words of thanks to Mr. Stockdale, who not only lent his grounds, but showed a thoroughly public spirit, and spared no personal labour to make all the visitors to the Show happy.

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SUNDAY SCHOOL TREAT.-There appeared to be a great desire among the children this year to go to the seaside. Although rather a large undertaking, it was decided to take all above a certain class to Hunstanton. The younger children had their treat at the Rectory on the Monday previously. Mr. Jessop very kindly had the little ones driven up from Pymore and back, and Mr. William Harrison with some assistance performed the same task for the children from S. Owen's. The elder ones with their teachers went to Hunstanton on Thursday the 22nd. To tell the tale of paddling, tumbling in the water, catching crabs and star-fish, etc., would take too long. Suffice it say that a good tea was provided, and at seven o'clock, very tired but happy, we all started out on our homeward journey reaching there without anyone being left behind, about ten.

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Parish magazine 1897

04/05/2008 12:54

January 1897

  January 1897   ANOTHER year is gone...

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04/05/2008 12:56

February 1897

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May 1897

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04/05/2008 13:03

June 1897

  June THE sixtieth year of Her Majesty the...

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04/05/2008 13:05

July 1897

  July THE past month has been one of varied...

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04/05/2008 13:06

August 1897

  August   RARELY have the crops looked...

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04/05/2008 13:07

September 1897

  September THE past has been a month almost...

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04/05/2008 13:08

October 1897

  October Two more Harvest Festivals have...

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Littledownham


Parish Magazine 1898

04/05/2008 13:16

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