04/05/2008 13:56

Delivery men

Delivery men

These shops were augmented by travelling purveyors of various merchandise, mainly food. The earlier ones of my memory were horse drawn but these were soon superceded by the motor van. These vans did most of their business in the remote fen areas. People looked forward to the delivery days for these chaps carried the local news with them, picking up another titbit at each call. Breakfast television had nothing on them. You knew who had died before they were cold; you had a good idea who was going to die tomorrow-"They didn't expect him to get through the night" so you wrote him off. The tale gathered strength and it was not unusual in the Fen to hear that someone had died three times before they were finally buried.

 

Forthcoming births were the real news. News that a newly wed couple were expecting was eagerly awaited; rapid calculations were made. I think it was not by chance that humans have then fingers. If you had one over it was alright, more than that-oh dear! ... One also heard of urgent wedding plans, one hand sufficed, that was really news. The travelling tradesmen knew it all- is it any wonder that they got a cup of tea at every house? They must have had bladders like oxen but they could certainly tell a good tale.

 

My earliest recollections of milk deliveries in the village were that milk was taken around in big pails and delivered into jugs placed on the doorstep. Measures hung in the pail suspend from the rim by their hooked end, a pint and a half measure. Len Hopkin served the major part of the village and Florrie Garner did Lawn Lane. The Harrison brothers of the Lawns Dairies brought us into the 20th Century when they made bottled milk available to all. We now look forward to paralysed milk from France which keeps forever and tastes like reclaimed custard.

 

 

 

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Parish magazine 1897

04/05/2008 12:54

January 1897

  January 1897   ANOTHER year is gone...

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04/05/2008 12:56

February 1897

  February 1897 ONE great white sheet of...

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04/05/2008 12:59

March 1897

  March FLOODS owing to the sudden thaw, and...

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04/05/2008 13:00

April 1897

  April THE CEMETERY.—-On Monday evening,...

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04/05/2008 13:02

May 1897

  May OUR first words must be those of...

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04/05/2008 13:03

June 1897

  June THE sixtieth year of Her Majesty the...

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04/05/2008 13:05

July 1897

  July THE past month has been one of varied...

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04/05/2008 13:06

August 1897

  August   RARELY have the crops looked...

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04/05/2008 13:07

September 1897

  September THE past has been a month almost...

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04/05/2008 13:08

October 1897

  October Two more Harvest Festivals have...

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Littledownham


Parish Magazine 1898

04/05/2008 13:16

January 1898

  January DURING the last month we have been...

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04/05/2008 13:20

February 1898

  February FORTUNATELY the great dark war...

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04/05/2008 13:21

March 1898

  March OUR first words in this month's...

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04/05/2008 13:22

April 1898

  April WAR at all times is a very terrible...

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04/05/2008 13:22

May 1898

  May FLOWER SHow.-A meeting of the...

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04/05/2008 13:23

June 1898

  June THE Jumble Sale in behalf of the...

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04/05/2008 13:25

July 1898

  July THE last month has been an eventful...

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04/05/2008 13:26

August 1898

  August ALL over England men are now busy...

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04/05/2008 13:27

September 1898

  September THE Harvest Thanksgiving at...

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04/05/2008 13:28

October 1898

  OCTOBER BITS ABOUT TEMPERANCE.-Some very...

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04/05/2008 13:29

November 1898

  November THE Annual Tea at Downham, was...

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